Sunday, May 17, 2015

Never underestimate how much random dudes on the internet can change history

Those of us on the Right are a generally pessimistic lot. Sometimes I imagine that it must be nice to be a liberal. Their history is one triumph after another. Some of them don't have particularly strong feelings about gay "marriage," for example, but they love feeling that they're on the correct side of history. Young liberals turned out in droves for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012, not because they had seriously considered the issues and relative merits of each candidate, but because they wanted the emotional validation of voting for the cool, hip black guy over the old, square white guys.

For rightists in general, and Traditionalist Catholics in particular, history reads like one long defeat. We observe the social dysfunction that has arisen from liberal triumphs but we can't publicly criticize their failures unless we do so from within the liberal frame. The perfect example of this to me is Sean Hannity wagging his finger and saying, "YOU LIBERALS are hypocrites!" Left-liberals and right-liberals catch each other making unprincipled exceptions and play it off as a cheap gotcha to score political points among the viewers of the 24 hour news networks. Questioning liberalism itself is verboten. There's a good reason why so many alt-right bloggers use pseudonyms.

I don't think of myself as a mighty intellectual in the vanguard of an exciting counter-revolutionary socio-political movement. That way lies an inevitable meltdown. I'm just an ordinary man who exercises his pattern-recognition skills, as are my five loyal readers I'm sure. It's good for us to compare notes. I enjoy conversing with like-minded men throughout the blogosphere. Discovering Traditionalist Catholicism, and later the Red Pill, or Reaction, or the manosphere, or whatever you want to call it was good for me because I realized I wasn't alone. I'm not the only one who noticed that the Church is a mess and society is rapidly devolving into anarcho-tyranny.

Writing long philosophical treatises on the internet is all well and good, but what's a normal man to do in a real world gone mad? You need to be careful about who you trust - I learned that lesson the hard way. At the same time, I think a lot of people are open to hearing realtalk, more than we think. Liberalism hasn't succeeded in completely suppressing our pattern recognition skills. What most people lack is the conceptual framework to articulate what they observe to be true. The State and the culture feed us endless propaganda about how we're so much smarter, freer, and just plain better than our stupid benighted great-grandparents who were chained by superstition and irrational bigotry. But, if we are in fact the freest and most enlightened we've ever been, why is civil society crumbling? If we're all blank slates (although now they're trying to deny that the slate even exists) then why do Americans of a certain racial background consistently lag behind Americans of other racial backgrounds?

When the mainstream media takes notice of the alt-right, they often describe it as made up of pick up artists, mens rights activists, and any number of dissimilar tribes. I think what we all have in common is realism. We want to understand the world as it really is. We may be wildly off the mark, and we have different responses to the reality of the 21st century West, but that's the thing which unites us. I'm of the opinion that we need to challenge the world in wherever and whenever we can, in whatever state of life we've embraced.

7 comments:

  1. Ringing with optimism. We ought to remember that all Karl Marx did was write a book, and long after his death, it changed the world (for the worse of course).It brought entire nations to their knees, a book!

    Ideas are more powerful than anyone truly realizes. If Traditionalism is the first idea, then Reaction is the last, and so the circle is complete, a ring of lies that starts and ends with a small but valiant segment of truth. I don't predict victory tomorrow, but I do predict victory. For in the face of truth, falsehood is damned to perish.

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    1. I write because I enjoy it, and because it helps me work out my worldview in a more systematic way. I like to hope that it might influence a few people for the better some day.

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  2. Mark has to be a caricature of a boy in his young twenties, in his early discovery Esoteric Traditionalism and bloated with self-importance. It's great to read him and have laugh. For me its a bit of an embarrassing laugh because I recognise my beginning in a lot of it.

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    1. I'm less interested in how a writer's tone comes off and more interested in whether he's right.

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    2. Tone? Am I back in kindergarten?

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    3. If you can't refute anything that has been said, you're a waste of time.

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  3. ideas are bullshit, might makes right, and right now the zionists have all the physical force on this shitty little c̶o̶u̶n̶t̶r̶y̶ planet

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